/ workflow

Git Tricks

Couple of weeks ago I saw this tweet from Mike:

I had similar problem couple times when dealing with Git. So, I created the following git command:

git undo

It is far easier to remember 😎

Git is powerful, but its build in commands can be confusing. Pretty much everything is possible but sometimes is so complicated it might as well be impossible. Because of this, I have a lot of helpers for Git.

In Git config files you can create aliases. Part of my .gitrc are the following aliases:

[alias]
  lol = log --graph --decorate --pretty='format:%C(yellow)%h%Cgreen%d%Creset %s %C(white) (%an, %ar)%Creset' --abbrev-commit
  undo = reset --soft HEAD^
  amend = commit --amend
  • git lol is just a pretty git logs
  • git undo removes the current commits but leave the changes
  • git amend would put your current changes into the previous commit

The other way you can extend Git is to create custom git commands by creating scripts starting with git-command-name and put them in your load path.

Then you can call git command.

I have a couple of those.

I create Pull Requests all the time because I work with feature branches. Because of this, I have git pull-request which pushes the current branch to GitHub and opens the new pull request screen.

Here is the source of the script:

#!/bin/bash

current_branch=`git rev-parse --abbrev-ref HEAD`
remote_url=`git remote get-url origin | awk '{gsub(/git@github.com:/,"")}1' | awk '{gsub(/\.git/,"")}1'`

git push  origin $current_branch --set-upstream

open https://github.com/$remote_url/compare/$current_branch?expand=1

While working on features, the master is changing. Keeping your feature branch up to date with the master is essential. So I have git rebase-on-master

Here is the source of the script:

#!/bin/bash

current_branch=`git rev-parse --abbrev-ref HEAD`
git checkout master
git pull origin master --rebase
git rebase master $current_branch

After I'm done with a branch, I have to remove it. So I have git delete-merged. It removes all merged branches compared to your current branch. It is useful when you pull a master after you have merged a feature branch

Here is the source of the script:

#!/bin/bash
git branch --merged | grep -v "\*" | xargs -n 1 git branch -d

Those are some of the most significant productivity boosters, I have to deal with Git. I have couple more tricks you can find in my config files.